Councillor Jill Whitehead’s statement on 2015-16 One Planet Sutton progress

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Sutton Council has released its latest One Planet Sutton progress report. The report sets out the progress on the 32 priority targets the council is making to become a One Planet borough by 2025. Sutton has been a One Planet Borough since 2009.

Councillor Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhoods Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“One Planet Sutton is about creating a borough where everyone can lead happy and healthy lives. Adopting more sustainable lifestyles helps save money and also reduces our dependence on natural resources. We set ourselves 32 ambitious priority targets to help us achieve our aim of becoming a One Planet borough.”

“With the help of residents and partners we have made good progress towards the targets. Our recent notable achievements include reducing the council’s CO2 emissions, using less water and improving the condition of the River Wandle.”

“We have made good progress, but there is still more to do to achieve all our targets.  We are not resting on our laurels and have plans in place to meet these ambitious targets. I encourage residents to download and read a copy of our report to learn more.”

A link to this year’s One Planet Sutton report is available here: http://bit.ly/2hDVvIR

Sutton to host international sustainability summit

Sutton logo big full colour

Delegates from across Europe are visiting the south London borough of Sutton later this month for an international summit where they will share their experiences of growing sustainable economies.

The Energising the Sustainable Economy in Cities summit is being hosted by Sutton Council and the Covenant of Mayors Office. Representatives from pioneering cities, organisations and businesses will share strategies and case studies to help cities take a best-practice approach to delivering innovative sustainability policies.

The summit will highlight best practice and innovative approaches to financing and delivering sustainable energy investment in cities. There will be presentations by representatives from Vienna, Copenhagen, Ljubljana, Gothenberg, Almada and Brussels.

Chris Jill and Hamish

Chris Jill and Hamish: out and about in Carshalton Central

Carshalton Central Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhood Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“As a One Planet borough, Sutton has long been committed to environmental sustainability. Through this summit we are bringing together partner organisations and delegates from across the UK and Europe to share advice and good practice, and learn from each other. We look forward to welcoming cities to join us for what will be an enjoyable and enlightening summit.”

The summit is at the Sutton Holiday Inn on Tuesday 18 OctoberAdmission is free, through places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. To book a place, either email tim.taylor@sutton.gov.uk and/or register on Eventbrite by going here

New Sutton waste service will see weekly food collection and more recycling

Sutton Council has approved plans to outsource waste collection and street cleaning services from next year that will see borough households have a new weekly food waste collection service and almost double the amount of recycling capacity.

The plans to outsource services have been developed by the four boroughs in the South London Waste Partnership – Croydon, Kingston, Merton and Sutton.

The maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance in Sutton and Merton will be under another contractor.

On 1 August 2016, Sutton Council endorsed:

  • Veolia as the recommended preferred bidder for a contract to provide a waste collection, street cleaning and winter gritting service across the four boroughs. Subject to approval from the other boroughs, the new service will start in Sutton in April 2017.
  • The Landscape Group as the recommended preferred bidder for a contract to provide maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance services to Sutton and Merton. Subject to approval from the other boroughs, the new service will begin in February 2017.

Sutton Council’s Environment and Neighbourhood Committee approved the preferred bidders at a meeting on 27 June 2016.

Sutton Council has agreed to the shared service approach with its neighbours due to the unprecedented Government cuts to the council’s budget, along with the opportunities to increase recycling rates. Currently Sutton has to save £31m from its annual budget due to Government cuts. The council’s annual budget is £148.4m.

The new contracts will enable Sutton Council to save £10.3m over the first eight years. It is estimated that Sutton’s recycling rate will increase from 37 per cent (2014/15) to 42 per cent by the end of the first year of the contract.

What it will mean for Sutton

Once the appointment of the approved contractors has been approved by all four boroughs, the process will enter a fine-tuning stage. Subject to this, the new services are likely to include:

Contract One (Veolia) – refuse, recycling, street cleaning and winter gritting

The changes will include:

  • A new weekly food waste collection. Food waste currently accounts for 40 per cent of residual waste in Sutton. This will mean less waste to go to landfill, which is good for the environment.
  • Increasing the amount of monthly recycling capacity per household from 480 litres to 810 litres. This includes a new smaller food waste bin collected weekly and an alternate-weekly collection of other recycling, with paper and card collected one week and tins, plastic and glass the next. The existing green recycling wheelie bin will be used to store paper and card, and a new recycling box will be provided for plastics, tin and glass bottles.
  • Residual waste (brown wheelie bin) will be collected fortnightly rather than weekly. At present around 40 per cent of brown-bin waste is food waste, so the additional recycling capacity will mean residents will be able to reduce significantly the amount of waste in their brown bins.
  • Garden waste collections for paying residents will be extended from nine months a year to all year round. This will be collected in the same green and brown wheelie bin.
  • Street cleaning operations will be extended to 10pm from the current 6.30am start.

Contract Two (The Landscape Group) – maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance

The Landscape Group will be responsible for the maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance. Sutton Council will continue to own and manage borough parks and open spaces, while:

  • Local Committees will continue to make decisions about replacing or adding equipment to parks, such as play and gym equipment and benches.
  • Friends of Parks will continue to be involved, and will also monitor the standard of maintenance of our parks, alongside the council.

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhood Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“We are trying our best to manage the unprecedented Government cuts to our budgets, while also maintaining excellent services for our residents. The partnership with our neighbouring boroughs is an innovative approach to enable us to do that through weekly food collections and more opportunities to recycle. The new services will mean Sutton saves more than £10m by 2025, as well as increasing our recycling rate from 37 per cent (2014/15) to 42 per cent by the end of the first year. We will do this by almost doubling the amount of recycling available to households in Sutton, including the new weekly food waste collection, which will help us go towards meeting the One Planet Sutton targets.”

Notes

  • Veolia is a UK leader in environmental solutions and The Landscape Group is a multi-award-winning horticultural, landscaping and grounds maintenance specialist.
  • The contracts would be for an initial eight years. If, after eight years, the contracts are performing well, there are options to extend them for two further periods each of eight years by mutual consent.
  • The procurement objectives are to reduce spend, increase income opportunities, and maintain high-quality services and customer satisfaction through environmentally-sustainable, carbon-effect, innovative solutions.
  • One Planet Sutton is a vision for the borough where people lead happy, healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025. The council is working in partnership with a wide range of local voluntary and community groups to deliver this vision under the themes of cutting carbon emissions, cutting waste, valuing our natural environment, supporting healthy communities and supporting the local economy. Find out more about the One Planet Sutton initiative here.
  • The South London Waste Partnership was formed in 2003 and has a proven record of providing cost-effective waste management services through the procurement of waste disposal, recycling and Household Refuse and Recycling Centre contracts.

Sutton’s proposed new waste collection service:

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste New bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Existing brown wheeled bin Fortnightly
Recycling Existing green wheeled bin and new recycling box Alternate weekly (paper and card one week; tins, cans and glass the next)
Garden Waste Existing garden waste bin Fortnightly

 

Current waste collection services provided by partner boroughs:

Croydon

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste Outside bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Black wheeled bin Fortnightly
Recycling Blue box and green box Alternate weekly (paper and card one week; tins, cans and glass the next)
Textiles Resident supplied plastic bag Weekly
Garden Waste Black bin with brown lid Fortnightly

 

Merton

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste Outside bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Sacks Weekly
Paper/Card Purple box (comingled) Weekly
Recycling Purple box (comingled) Weekly
Garden Waste Brown bin Fortnightly

 

Kingston

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste Outside bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Black wheeled bin Fortnightly
Recycling Wheeled bin with a blue lid, and green box Alternate weekly (paper and card one week; tins, cans and glass the next)
Garden Waste Black bin with brown lid Fortnightly

Borough pupil uses Sutton residents to save energy and save the planet

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Amaasha Silva, winner of the EcoLocal poster contest, shows her winning design to Mayor Richard Clifton and Tansy Honey of EcoLocal.

A poster designed by Sutton school pupil Amaasha Silva is to be used to promote energy conservation across the borough.

Amaasha, age 11, a Year 6 pupil at Stanley Park Junior School, was the overall winner of an art competition that saw entries from 264 pupils from across 10 Sutton borough schools.

The competition was organised by EcoLocal, a local charity, as part of a school energy project commissioned by Sutton Council in line with its One Planet Sutton aspiration to improve the quality of life of residents in a way that reduces our impact on the environment.

Last winter EcoLocal visited 10 borough schools to deliver assemblies and lessons about saving energy at school and at home. The schools were also advised on energy management to save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and saved an average 7 per cent of energy through behaviour change alone.

The students took home an activity book that enabled them to carry out an energy audit of their home to see where they were wasting energy and record a week of energy-saving activities. The activity book also included a Home Energy Poster Competition.

A total of 264 borough pupils returned the activity book and entered the competition to design a poster to promote saving energy.

Amaasha_posterewinAmaasha’s winning poster design.

Amaasha Silva was the overall winner from across the 10 schools and has won an energy-saving kit for her home. She received her award from the Mayor of Sutton, Cllr Richard Clifton during a school assembly on Friday 15 July.

The Mayor said afterwards:

“I was delighted to present this award to Amaasha as her poster gets conveys the ecological message in a clear and direct manner. In Sutton we all have to play our part and do our bit in saving the planet. This poster will remind all borough residents and businesses of the part they have to play.”

Tansy Honey, of EcoLocal, said:

“It was great that so many Sutton students got involved in saving energy at home through this project. We hope Amaasha’s brilliant poster will help encourage more people to save money and cut carbon dioxide. Amassha’s poster was chosen as the winner because it is well designed and drawn, has the simple and clear message of ‘Save Our Planet’, and demonstrates that she had learned that saving energy will save money at home and help the planet by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere.”

Amaasha’s poster will be displayed across the borough in libraries and on noticeboards later this year.

One Planet Sutton is a vision for the borough where people lead happy, healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025. The council is working in partnership with a wide range of local voluntary and community groups to deliver this vision under the themes of cutting carbon emissions, cutting waste, valuing our natural environment, supporting healthy communities and supporting the local economy. Find out more about the One Planet Sutton initiative here.

Sutton Council secures £3m Lottery grant to restore and improve Beddington Park

Flint Bridge in Beddington Park

Beddington Park is to be extensively restored to make it even more welcoming to residents and borough visitors alike after Sutton Council secured a grant of just over £3m from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and Big Lottery Fund.

After four years of planning and development Sutton Council has successfully been granted £3,009,400 from the HLF and Big Lottery Fund Parks for People programme to restore, improve and interpret the 58-hectare park that stretches across Beddington, Hackbridge and Wallington. The works will total £3.7m.

Thanks to hard work from key stakeholders, local residents and the project team the plans will now become a reality. Work due to commence in late 2016 will see a number of visual improvements and new features created including:

  • Enlarging the children’s playground and introducing more equipment to encourage children of all backgrounds to use the facilities.
  • Dredging of the lake to create a sustainable solution to the ongoing build-up of silt.
  • Restoring the Grange Gardens to include a new community orchard.
  • Improve entrances and signage, including new interpretation boards and materials.
  • Improve parking and access.
  • Creating a new garden in the Churchyard Extension.
  • Habitat improvement to wetlands, woodlands and the stock pond.

A three-year activities and events programme will begin later this year and include children’s activities, fitness opportunities, walks, talks, and a range of volunteering opportunities.

There will be an ambitious programme of repairs to existing footpaths, as well as replacement shrubs and herbaceous planting.

Beddington Park was originally a deer park in the 14th century for the noble Carew family, whose manor house still stands in today. The River Wandle runs through the park and culminates in the lake in the Grange Gardens.

The National Lottery grant will enable the improvement of the park’s lakes and waterways, and the Grange Gardens layout.

The project aims to restore and promote Beddington Park’s historic and nature conservation values, allowing visitors and surrounding communities to actively engage with this fantastic open space.

The improvements to Beddington Park will support the council’s One Planet Living targets around cutting carbon emissions and waste, value the natural environment and support healthy communities through active participation, and provide opportunities for the community to enjoy the park’s open space and heritage.

Mary Morrissey, Strategic Director of Environment, Housing and Regeneration at Sutton Council, said:

“We’re delighted that the Heritage Lottery Fund has given us this financial support. The redevelopment of Beddington Park through the HLF and Big Lottery Fund Parks for People programme is of major significance to the borough. To secure a Heritage Lottery Fund grant of just over £3m is a magnificent achievement for everyone involved in submitting the grant bid, particularly our residents. This will make Beddington Park more popular than ever with residents and borough visitors. It will showcase how Sutton is a great place for green open spaces.”

The funding for Beddington Park comes as part of an announcement of £30.7m for 16 parks across the UK.

Sir Peter Luff, HLF’s Chair, said on behalf of HLF and Big lottery Fund:

“It’s clear that our parks are important to us in countless ways – from physical and mental wellbeing to a connection with nature and our heritage. It’s also clear, however, that public parks must work in new ways to respond to the funding challenges they face and this investment, thanks to National Lottery players, will help them to do this. We’re delighted to announce this funding today, especially in time for the tenth Love Parks Week, and look forward to a bright future for these parks. In 2014 the Beddington Park HLF and Big Lottery Fund Stage One bid successfully gained £251,000 of funding to develop the Parks for People project. The HLF and Big Lottery Fund grant covers £3,009,400 of the Phase Two project costs of £3,706,788″.

The Beddington Park project has five key themes to improve the environment:

  • Access, safety and infrastructure. Work will be undertaken at various entrances to the park, including new gates, railings, planted areas, welcome and visitor information and direction signs. The park boundary will be enhanced, more trees will be planted and succession planning for historic trees, and new noticeboards will have information on the park’s history, wildlife and diversity. The park’s playground will also be made larger and have more play equipment installed.
  • Activities and events. A project co-ordinator will be employed to support and develop volunteer activities in the park.
  • Improvements to the large amount of wildlife, plant and animal life within the park, including improvements to the Carew Manor wetland. There will also be activities organised through the volunteer co-ordinator and with other stakeholder groups to improve and understand the park’s biodiversity.
  • Repairs to existing footpaths, replacement shrubs and herbaceous planting, and changes to the Grange garden layout including an orchard with a meadow. The aim is to use some of the plants and schemes that would have been in the garden when it was created in the 1870s.
  • Lakes and waterways. Silt will be removed from the stock pond and the main Grange Lake, and there will be river improvements in line with the River Wandle catchment plan, including a newly created separate river channel through the lake. This will ensure there will be no need to de-silt the lake again for many years and meets the sustainability requirements of Sutton Council, the HLF and the Environment Agency.

One Planet Sutton is a vision for the borough where people lead happy, healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025. The council is working in partnership with a wide range of local voluntary and community groups to deliver this vision under the themes of cutting carbon emissions, cutting waste, valuing our natural environment, supporting healthy communities and supporting the local economy. Find out more about the One Planet Sutton initiative here.

About the Big Lottery Fund
The Big Lottery Fund supports the aspirations of people who want to make life better for their communities across the UK. We are responsible for giving out 40% of the money raised by the National Lottery for good causes and invest over £650 million a year in projects big and small in health, education, environment and charitable purposes.

About the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF)
Thanks to National Lottery players, we invest money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife. www.hlf.org.uk @heritagelottery

The Parks for People programme uses money raised by National Lottery players to support the regeneration, conservation and increased enjoyment of public parks and cemeteries. In England the two Lottery Funds have been working in partnership from 2006 to deliver a multi-million pound investment in public parks.  Find out more about how to apply at www.hlf.org.uk/parks.

Sutton Council to increase recycling with one brown waste bin policy

 

In order to encourage increased recycling and help reduce the cost of waste collection, Sutton Council is introducing a policy to only empty non-recyclable waste from one brown bin per borough household.

​There are now fewer items that cannot be recycled from home as a result of Sutton’s green bin recycling service. However, around 4,500 of the borough’s 65,100 households have more than one brown bin for their non-recyclable waste and do not have any incentive to recycle.

Households with more than one brown waste bin will receive letters between 18 July and 30 September 2016 to tell them about the new policy. A Recycling Advisor will deliver the letters, answer questions and provide information about the council’s recycling service. Households will also be able to order larger or extra green recycling bins to help them recycle.

Collections of waste in the additional brown bins will stop at the property around three or four weeks after the letter has been received by the household. ​Households in Wallington North will be the first to receive the letters and the timing of the change will be staggered according to the area.

The council will remove from households any additional brown bins placed outside on any waste collection day that follows a specified date. However, residents can keep their additional brown bin for storage or to collect garden waste in before taking it to the Reuse and Recycling Centre at Kimpton Park Way. To ensure their additional brown bin is not removed, residents will need to keep it inside their property boundary.

Mary Morrissey, Strategic Director of Environment, Housing and Regeneration at Sutton Council, said:

“Collecting just one brown waste bin per property will save the council money and increase the amount of waste being recycled in Sutton. The additional brown bins that the council empties contain 100 tonnes of materials that could be recycled every year. Instead these materials are being disposed of in landfill. Emptying one bin per property will therefore help us save money, increase the borough’s recycling rate and support the council’s One Planet Sutton ambitions. A study by independent environmental experts indicates that council collection costs can be reduced by £10,000 a year by only collecting one bin per property.”

This new waste and recycling policy was agreed by Sutton Council in November 2015.

Recycling News

Don’t throw it out – pass it on
There are so many ways that people can re-use old clothes, furniture, and household items – and just because you don’t want it any more doesn’t mean that someone else won’t.
Sutton Council is helping residents find ways they can re-use household items to benefit the environment & reduce costs. This will help the borough achieve its One Planet Sutton aims of becoming a greener, more sustainable area.

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environments & Neighbourhoods Committee, said:
It’s too easy to assume that the only thing to do with our old clothes, furniture and household items is throw them out when they’ve outlived their use to us. But too often we don’t think about whether we can pass them on rather than dispose of them. There are so many ways to save money and help the environment by avoiding needless waste – encouraging people to re-use items is one of our top priorities.”

There are five main reasons to re-use household items rather than dispose of them:
Saving money: Buying second hand is cheaper than buying new – and if you can sell on older unwanted items yourself that’s extra money for the household budget.
Help other people: Donating items for re-use helps other members of the community – give someone else the chance to love the things you don’t need any more.
Help climate change by saving energy: By re-using items we help reduce the amount of energy used to produce and supply products.
Help ourselves by conserving the planet’s resources: Every time new things are made, raw materials are used. Some of these materials will run out at some point and mining, quarrying and logging for them creates air and water pollution around the world. We play a part in reducing this when we choose to re-use rather than buy new.
Reduce waste: Re-using things means we send less of Sutton’s waste to landfill sites. Doesn’t it make sense to not bury things in the ground when somebody else in Sutton or elsewhere could still be using them?
One way to pass on unwanted goods is by using sites such as Freecycle, eBay, or Gumtree, where you can arrange to sell or even gift items rather than dispose of them. Placing an advert in a local classified paper is also a great way of finding people who may want the items you don’t need any more.
Not all items will have a resale value. But that doesn’t mean these items should be disposed of either. There are many charitable organisations who will accept and even collect donations of older clothes or furniture items as well as old CDs, DVDs and books. It’s also possible to donate old computer equipment to some organisations.

Learning some basic maintenance and mending techniques can help you make clothes last longer – it could even be the chance to learn new skills as SCOLA have classes in upholstery, sewing, and jewellery repair. Additionally, many local dry-cleaners will offer repair services at reasonable prices to help keep your clothes looking good for longer.

One Planet Sutton is a vision for Sutton where people lead happy, healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025. The council is working in partnership with a wide range of local voluntary and community groups to deliver this vision under the themes of cutting carbon emissions, cutting waste, valuing our natural environment, supporting healthy communities and supporting the local economy. You can find out more about the One Planet Sutton initiative here.

Visit the Sutton Council website here for more in-depth tips about reusing and recycling clothes, furniture and other household goods. There are also information about local organisation and charities which will accept donations and details of how to get in touch with them.

The British Heart Foundation and Emmaus Homeless Foundation will arrange collection of larger, bulky items in Wallington and Sutton.

One Planet Sutton report shows borough continues to make good progress in key areas

Sutton Council is continuing to make steady progress in ensuring the borough meets its environmental, social and economic sustainability targets.

The One Planet Sutton Progress Report for 2014-15 published today (Wednesday) shows the council is continuing to meet key priority targets under five themes:

  • Cutting carbon emissions
  • Cutting waste
  • Valuing our natural environment
  • Supporting healthy communities
  • Supporting the local economy

The 24-page progress report says that of Sutton’s 32 targets, 21 targets have been exceeded, met or are on target to be met, seven are not on target and the remaining four targets do not apply to 2014-15.

Key target findings are:

  • Cutting carbon emissions
    • The council’s Carbon Management Plan has saved the council an estimated £1.9m in energy costs since 2010-11.
  • Cutting waste
    • Total household waste in the borough has decreased since the baseline from 77,045 tonnes in 2009-10 to 73,350 tonnes in 2014-15, representing a 4.8 per cent decrease. This is above the national average of 2 per cent waste reduction per household.
  • Valuing our natural environment
    • The Sutton Food Forum was formed in December 2014 to drive delivery of local and sustainable food targets. The Sutton Food Forum has achieved Sustainable Food Cities Status and Sutton is one of only seven London boroughs to have achieved this standard.
    • During 2014-15 a number of improvement projects were undertaken along the River Wandle to enhance habitats and biodiversity, and reduce river pollution, including a Silt n SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) project in Hackbridge to alleviate flooding.
  • Supporting healthy communities
    • During autumn 2014 the council and its partners ran 47 free One Planet Sutton-themed events across 20 venues as part of the Imagine Festival 2014.
    • Fourteen parks across the borough have outdoor gyms, nine of which were installed in 2014. These outdoor gyms give adults access to free exercise equipment aimed at all levels of fitness and deliver health improvements.
    • In March 2015 a Stage 2 Heritage Lottery Fund bid for £1.52m was submitted to improve Whitehall Museum in Cheam and bring the heritage of Whitehall to life in the community.
  • Supporting the local economy
    • Opportunity Sutton, Sutton Council’s economic development arm, has attracted £330m investment into the borough and has contributed to the continued positive progress towards the Supporting the Local Economy targets.
    • On 1 April 2014 the council commenced payment of the London Living Wage for all employees, recognising the minimum income required for employees to meet their basic living needs.

However, the One Planet targets are ambitious and there are short- and medium-term goals of 2017 and 2025 respectively. Although all goals may not be reached by 2017, the overarching aim is for Sutton to become a One Planet Borough by 2025.

For example, while between 2007 and 2013 there was a 14.4 per cent reduction in CO2, which is on track to meet the 20 per cent target by 2017, the council has only been able to reduce carbon emissions from council buildings by 15 per cent between 2010/11 and 2014/2015 when the target was 50 per cent.

This is mainly because of an increase in the use of more CO2 intensive fuels by the UK power grid, however overall Sutton has the third lowest CO2 emissions out of the 32 London boroughs.

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhoods Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“Sutton prides itself on being a green borough and I am delighted we are meeting the majority of the One Planet Sutton targets. We are one of the best London council’s for low carbon emissions and our carbon management plan has saved £1.9m in energy costs over the past five years. There is no question that these targets are ambitious, and the work to meet them is made even harder in the current financial climate where our budgets are being cut by government.  However, we will continue to look for ways to innovate and improve our performance and the One Planet Sutton report is a useful guide to benchmark where we are and see which areas we are succeeding in and which require more work by the council and our partners.”

The council committed to One Planet Living in 2009, creating a set of challenging sustainability targets to enable Sutton to become a One Planet Borough by 2025. But targets have twice been revised since 2009 to reflect changes in national policy and funding to local government.

Over the coming year Sutton will continue to deliver a wide variety of projects to help the borough meet its One Planet Sutton targets. These include the start of renovation of Whitehall Museum to make it into a historical and cultural hub, holding recycling roadshows and workshops across the borough, and continue progress towards creating a low-carbon energy network.

  • The One Planet Sutton report can be found here.

Lib Dem run Sutton Council reaffirms its green credentials

Sutton Council has set out an updated strategy for delivery of its One Planet Sutton ambitions, reaffirming its commitment to being a greener borough in partnership with organisations across the borough.

At the Environment and Neighbourhoods Committee meeting on Thursday 18th June the council agreed to keep the five One Planet Sutton themes aimed at reducing the borough’s carbon footprint. The five themes are:

  • Cutting carbon emissions
  • Cutting waste
  • Valuing our natural environment
  • Supporting healthy communities, and
  • Supporting the local economy.

These five themes are embedded in everything the council does, from targeting its work on community energy schemes, the growing of local food, and sustainable transport by encouraging walking, cycling and use of public transport.  The council will continue to undertake work across all of the One Planet themes to reduce carbon emissions. By targeting resources on deliverable projects within each of the five themes Sutton Council can re-endorse its vision for the borough to be London’s most-sustainable suburb.

Over the past four years, more than £8.5m of funding has been levered into the borough to help deliver projects contributing to its One Planet Sutton targets, and the council has made over £1.9m savings from council energy usage. The council has been monitoring targets annually relating to borough-wide energy reduction, waste, local food, transport, flooding and water reduction.  The council estimates the direct financial savings of the service review will be £84,700 from the 2014/15 budget.  Benchmarking of Sutton’s performance by the charity Bioregional confirms that Sutton is ranked the highest outer London borough and the third-highest London council overall in terms of having the lowest CO2 emissions.

Cllr. Jill Whitehead

Cllr. Jill Whitehead

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhood Committee, said:

“Sutton is committed to delivering a borough where residents have an excellent quality of life, and where our natural resources and wildlife are preserved for future generations.  Our revised sustainability strategy will allow the council to focus limited resources where we can provide best value. This includes increased partnership working on projects such as community-owned solar schemes and community-led behaviour change programmes.”

Sian Cooke, Senior Project Officer at Bioregional, said:

“We’re delighted to be working with Sutton Council on its refocused sustainability strategy in order to really push Sutton’s aspirations and achieve even more. Our focus will be to help local people benefit by saving money on their energy bills as well as lowering the borough’s carbon emissions. We’re also working with Volunteer Centre Sutton to find practical ways for Sutton’s volunteers to apply sustainability in their placements and bring One Planet Sutton to new audiences.”