Everything you wanted to know about recycling, but were afraid to ask!

Sutton Council

Please find below a link to Sutton Council’s new video release ‘Everything you wanted to know about recycling, but were afraid to ask!’

Click on:- http://www.newsroomsutton.co.uk/?p=4099

Kind regards,

Nick Dovey, Communications Officer

London Borough of Sutton, Civic Offices, St. Nicholas Way, Sutton SM1 1EA      

020 8770 5634

Sutton Council launches recycling campaign to sort fact from fiction

BINZZZZ

Sutton Council has launched a recycling campaign explaining what can and cannot be recycled, and to sort out recycling fact from fiction.

The campaign seeks to clarify which items should go in the brown waste bin or the green recycling bin – for example, disposable coffee cups cannot be recycled, but their lids and sleeves can be.

The council is also seeking to dispel some recycling myths by encouraging borough residents through social media to ask the experts their questions about recycling.

Before launching the campaign, more than 300 Sutton residents were interviewed to assist in understanding borough recycling behaviours.

Sutton Council is working with borough primary schools to run a series of recycling workshops that will be led and delivered by young people.

Sutton residents have also been involved in the project, putting forward ideas and visiting the material recycling facility in Crayford, Kent to see first-hand how the recycling process works.

Graham Catt, a Beddington resident who went to the material recycling facility, said:

“We all need to be careful what we put into the green bin. It surprised me just how much unwanted material, such as plastic bags, had to be removed by hand, at great time and expense.”

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhood Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“We know that people in Sutton want to do the right thing when it comes to recycling, and it’s our job to make it as easy as possible for them to do this. This is the message at the heart of our campaign. Encouraging people to recycle more is all part of our One Planet Sutton vision for Sutton, where people lead happy and healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025.”

Sutton Council successfully bid for funding from the Department of Communities and Local Government and the London Waste and Recycling Board to help residents waste less and recycle more. 

Sorting out recycling fact from recycling fiction

Myth: All my recycling ends up getting thrown away with the rubbish anyway.
Not true. We know the lorries that collect your recycling and rubbish look the same but your recycling is collected in a separate lorry than the rubbish. Your recycling is taken to a Waste Transfer Site in Beddington before being placed onto large freighter trucks and delivered to a Materials Recycling Facility (MRF). At the MRF recycling is sorted by machines and people by material type (i.e. paper, aluminium) and then bailed. Then it is sent to reprocessors to be recycled into new products.

Myth: There is no point recycling, it doesn’t make a difference.
Recycling stops tonnes of rubbish being buried in landfill. In the UK, recycling saves about 10-15m tonnes of carbon emissions a year – the equivalent of taking 3.5m cars off the road. Recycling costs less than sending waste to landfill so it helps to reduce the costs of waste management in Sutton.

Myth: You can only recycle paper a few times.
Fibres in paper start to break down after they have been recycled five or six times, but the material can still be used to make egg cartons, packaging, loft insulation, paints and even new road surfaces.

Myth: Recycling metal uses more energy than extracting the raw material in the first place.
Recycling aluminium cans saves up to 95 per cent of the energy needed to make new cans from fresh raw material. The energy saved in not having to make just one aluminium can from scratch is enough to power a TV for three hours. Every tonne of new aluminium made creates four tonnes of waste, whereas a tonne of recycled aluminium creates no waste.

Myth: Recycled glass is worse quality than other glass.
Glass can be recycled endlessly without any loss of quality.

Recycling Top Tips

  • Remember to wash, squash and take the lids off your plastic bottles before you recycle them.
  • Keep a container for recycling right next to the bin at home, so recycling becomes an easy option.
  • Buy goods made from recycled materials – this is great for the environment and for encouraging people to recycle more.

Dig out your bric-a-brac and dust off your old clothes – Jumble Trail is coming to Sutton

A jumble trail event.

Jumble Trails are a fantastic way to clear out some old items you no longer as you make new friends in your neighbourhood.

Jumble Trail is coming to Sutton for the first time on Saturday 1 October, with the support of Recycle for London, the South London Waste Partnership and Sutton Council.

Residents who live in the Benhilton area are encouraged to clear out their cupboards and set up stall in their front gardens. As the saying goes, ‘one man’s junk is another man’s treasure’.

A Jumble Trail is like a car boot sale but on your street.  Communities coordinate via www.jumbletrail.com to set up stalls outside their houses to sell bric-a-brac, toys, vintage clothes, cakes or whatever.  The aim is to encourage reuse and recycling at a grassroots level and to enhance community spirit.  The Sutton Jumble Trail will take place on Saturday 1 October between 10am – 4pm in residential roads in the Benhilton area.

Cllr Marlene Heron, Chair of the Sutton Local Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“I’m really pleased that Sutton is holding a Jumble Trail event – many thanks to the organisers for their hard work. Reusing or recycling our unwanted belongings rather than simply throwing them out makes a big difference to our environment. The Jumble Trail in Benhilton is a great opportunity for residents to make new friends in their neighbourhoods as they clear out some of their old items – and who knows, maybe even pick up a bargain or two in the process.”

The event wouldn’t be possible if it wasn’t for local Jumble Trail Champion Jacky Barker.  As a Jumble Trail Champion Jacky’s role is to encourage households in her local community to register their involvement in the event and set up a stall for the day.

Taking part in the event won’t cost you a penny as the usual stall fee is being covered by funding from Recycle for London. The Jumble Trail is part of their ‘Repair and Reuse’ programme of events taking place across London this autumn.

Even if you live outside the catchment area for this particular Jumble Trail, you can still get involved and support the event by popping along on the day and seeking out a bargain or two.

To check whether your address is inside the event radius and for further information visit the Benhilton Jumble Trail event page here.

Waste Collection Changes – 16 things….

The number and types of bins and collection of bins

  1. How many bins are you giving to people?

It is proposed that the majority of homes will be provided with the following containers from April 2017, in addition to their existing containers:

  • Kitchen caddy and food waste bin for the food waste service
  • A recycling box for recyclable plastics, glass and cans

Please see here.

The proposed waste and recycling system is expected to increase recycling capacity, recycling performance and reduce costs.

  1. Is there any flexibility i.e. an additional green bin for recycling?

Yes. Residents will be able to request additional containers for the recycling and food waste collections.

  1. Where can I put garden waste as I currently put it in the brown bin and can’t afford the green garden waste service?

Garden waste should not be put into brown bins.

Alternatives to the chargeable garden waste service are:

  • Take garden waste to Kimpton Park Way Reuse and Recycling Centre for recycling
  • Compost garden waste in your home compost bin. If you have not got a compost bin, or would like additional bins, you can order a free bin (£5 delivery charge) here.
  • If your circumstances change and you would like to sign up for the Green Garden Waste service, please click here
  1. Given the amount of plastics I recycle, I need a bin not a box

The boxes will be stackable and residents can have as many boxes as they need for their glass and plastics recycling.

  1. Can the recycling trucks collect bins as well as boxes?  

The contents of the recycling bins and boxes will be kept separate at all times. Recycling boxes will be emptied into a wheeled bin, which will kept on the lorry. The wheeled bin is then emptied in the lorry.

  1. Can we have a bigger brown bin otherwise it will overflow in two weeks (household of four) We need adequate sized bins if it’s collected fortnightly

We have no plans to increase the size or number of the brown bins at each property in the borough. In Sutton currently more than 40% of the waste in brown bins is food waste. Veolia plans to provide a new bin for food waste so it can be separated out from the brown bin waste. Food waste and recycling will be collected every week. This means the remaining brown bin waste will not contain food or create smells that attract vermin.

  1. Can houses share bins?

Yes. It is possible for neighbours to share bins. Residents would need to arrange this themselves.

  1. What food waste bins will be provided and will the Council provide biodegradable bags?

For the food waste collection, a small outdoor bin and a kitchen caddy will be provided.

There are no plans to provide bags to collect food waste.

  1. How have you decided the size ratio of paper to plastics receptacles? We use more plastic so a bin for that would be better, and we need a big brown bin.

In order to preserve its value, it’s important to keep paper and card dry. Wet paper and card is considered contaminated and has to be sent to landfill, which costs money and reduces the opportunity to generate income from recycling. So it’s best all round to use a water-tight bin to recycle paper and card.

The boxes will be stackable and residents can have as many boxes as they need for their glass and plastics recycling.

  1. Will you provide the bins (no charge)?

Yes. The new recycling bins will be provided free of charge. There will continue to be a charge for Green Garden Waste bins.

The system of segregation and different collections

  1. This is too complicated and confusing

Detailed communications will be provided before the new service is rolled out to provide clear information about which items should go into which bin. A wide range of communication channels will be used including leaflets, local press, road shows and social media. If you have any suggestions about how you would like to find out information about the new waste and recycling service please let us know.

  1. Do we really expect people to sort their rubbish?  

The proposed waste and recycling system is expected to increase recycling capacity, recycling performance and reduce costs. We hope that residents will support us. The proposals are very similar to services which are already successfully running in a number of Councils across the country.

  1. How will people especially older people remember what goes where?  

Detailed communications will be provided before the new service is rolled out to provide clear information about which items should go into which bin. A wide range of communication channels will be used including leaflets, local press road shows and social media. If you have any suggestions about how you would like to find out information about the new waste and recycling service please let us know. Once the new service is up and running, we will continue to distribute information about what can be recycled in which bin, to help people to remember.

  1. It is too much effort to expect people to separate materials

The proposed waste and recycling system is expected to increase recycling capacity, recycling performance and reduce costs. We hope that residents will support us.

  1. It’s a waste of time separating materials

Collecting recyclable materials separately increases the quantity and quality of recycling, and reduces carbon emissions. Research from the European Commission suggests two-stream collections (alternating weekly collections of paper/card and tins/bottles/plastics), can help reduce costs. Separating these items reduces the likelihood of contaminated recycling material, which has to be sent to landfill at additional financial and environmental cost. Also, we can generate more recycling income by separating out our waste which helps preserve other vital Council services.

  1. I am confused about what plastic can be recycled, polythene, tv magazines, tin foil, shopping bags, hearing aids, tablet wrappers, torches, small batteries?

We have very recently delivered leaflets and bin stickers to residents about the recycling service. If you would like a copy, please ring us on 020 8770 5000 with your address and we will organise for one to get to you.

There is also an A to Z list of materials that can be recycled in Sutton and where they can be recycled, on our website, which also includes a detailed list of the types of materials that can be recycled from home using the green bin. We cannot list every item, therefore if you are unsure whether something can be recycled, please get in touch with the Council.

New Sutton waste service will see weekly food collection and more recycling

Sutton Council has approved plans to outsource waste collection and street cleaning services from next year that will see borough households have a new weekly food waste collection service and almost double the amount of recycling capacity.

The plans to outsource services have been developed by the four boroughs in the South London Waste Partnership – Croydon, Kingston, Merton and Sutton.

The maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance in Sutton and Merton will be under another contractor.

On 1 August 2016, Sutton Council endorsed:

  • Veolia as the recommended preferred bidder for a contract to provide a waste collection, street cleaning and winter gritting service across the four boroughs. Subject to approval from the other boroughs, the new service will start in Sutton in April 2017.
  • The Landscape Group as the recommended preferred bidder for a contract to provide maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance services to Sutton and Merton. Subject to approval from the other boroughs, the new service will begin in February 2017.

Sutton Council’s Environment and Neighbourhood Committee approved the preferred bidders at a meeting on 27 June 2016.

Sutton Council has agreed to the shared service approach with its neighbours due to the unprecedented Government cuts to the council’s budget, along with the opportunities to increase recycling rates. Currently Sutton has to save £31m from its annual budget due to Government cuts. The council’s annual budget is £148.4m.

The new contracts will enable Sutton Council to save £10.3m over the first eight years. It is estimated that Sutton’s recycling rate will increase from 37 per cent (2014/15) to 42 per cent by the end of the first year of the contract.

What it will mean for Sutton

Once the appointment of the approved contractors has been approved by all four boroughs, the process will enter a fine-tuning stage. Subject to this, the new services are likely to include:

Contract One (Veolia) – refuse, recycling, street cleaning and winter gritting

The changes will include:

  • A new weekly food waste collection. Food waste currently accounts for 40 per cent of residual waste in Sutton. This will mean less waste to go to landfill, which is good for the environment.
  • Increasing the amount of monthly recycling capacity per household from 480 litres to 810 litres. This includes a new smaller food waste bin collected weekly and an alternate-weekly collection of other recycling, with paper and card collected one week and tins, plastic and glass the next. The existing green recycling wheelie bin will be used to store paper and card, and a new recycling box will be provided for plastics, tin and glass bottles.
  • Residual waste (brown wheelie bin) will be collected fortnightly rather than weekly. At present around 40 per cent of brown-bin waste is food waste, so the additional recycling capacity will mean residents will be able to reduce significantly the amount of waste in their brown bins.
  • Garden waste collections for paying residents will be extended from nine months a year to all year round. This will be collected in the same green and brown wheelie bin.
  • Street cleaning operations will be extended to 10pm from the current 6.30am start.

Contract Two (The Landscape Group) – maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance

The Landscape Group will be responsible for the maintenance of parks, cemeteries and ground maintenance. Sutton Council will continue to own and manage borough parks and open spaces, while:

  • Local Committees will continue to make decisions about replacing or adding equipment to parks, such as play and gym equipment and benches.
  • Friends of Parks will continue to be involved, and will also monitor the standard of maintenance of our parks, alongside the council.

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment and Neighbourhood Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“We are trying our best to manage the unprecedented Government cuts to our budgets, while also maintaining excellent services for our residents. The partnership with our neighbouring boroughs is an innovative approach to enable us to do that through weekly food collections and more opportunities to recycle. The new services will mean Sutton saves more than £10m by 2025, as well as increasing our recycling rate from 37 per cent (2014/15) to 42 per cent by the end of the first year. We will do this by almost doubling the amount of recycling available to households in Sutton, including the new weekly food waste collection, which will help us go towards meeting the One Planet Sutton targets.”

Notes

  • Veolia is a UK leader in environmental solutions and The Landscape Group is a multi-award-winning horticultural, landscaping and grounds maintenance specialist.
  • The contracts would be for an initial eight years. If, after eight years, the contracts are performing well, there are options to extend them for two further periods each of eight years by mutual consent.
  • The procurement objectives are to reduce spend, increase income opportunities, and maintain high-quality services and customer satisfaction through environmentally-sustainable, carbon-effect, innovative solutions.
  • One Planet Sutton is a vision for the borough where people lead happy, healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025. The council is working in partnership with a wide range of local voluntary and community groups to deliver this vision under the themes of cutting carbon emissions, cutting waste, valuing our natural environment, supporting healthy communities and supporting the local economy. Find out more about the One Planet Sutton initiative here.
  • The South London Waste Partnership was formed in 2003 and has a proven record of providing cost-effective waste management services through the procurement of waste disposal, recycling and Household Refuse and Recycling Centre contracts.

Sutton’s proposed new waste collection service:

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste New bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Existing brown wheeled bin Fortnightly
Recycling Existing green wheeled bin and new recycling box Alternate weekly (paper and card one week; tins, cans and glass the next)
Garden Waste Existing garden waste bin Fortnightly

 

Current waste collection services provided by partner boroughs:

Croydon

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste Outside bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Black wheeled bin Fortnightly
Recycling Blue box and green box Alternate weekly (paper and card one week; tins, cans and glass the next)
Textiles Resident supplied plastic bag Weekly
Garden Waste Black bin with brown lid Fortnightly

 

Merton

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste Outside bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Sacks Weekly
Paper/Card Purple box (comingled) Weekly
Recycling Purple box (comingled) Weekly
Garden Waste Brown bin Fortnightly

 

Kingston

Service Container Collection frequency
Food Waste Outside bin and kitchen caddy Weekly
Residual Waste Black wheeled bin Fortnightly
Recycling Wheeled bin with a blue lid, and green box Alternate weekly (paper and card one week; tins, cans and glass the next)
Garden Waste Black bin with brown lid Fortnightly

Sutton Council to increase recycling with one brown waste bin policy

 

In order to encourage increased recycling and help reduce the cost of waste collection, Sutton Council is introducing a policy to only empty non-recyclable waste from one brown bin per borough household.

​There are now fewer items that cannot be recycled from home as a result of Sutton’s green bin recycling service. However, around 4,500 of the borough’s 65,100 households have more than one brown bin for their non-recyclable waste and do not have any incentive to recycle.

Households with more than one brown waste bin will receive letters between 18 July and 30 September 2016 to tell them about the new policy. A Recycling Advisor will deliver the letters, answer questions and provide information about the council’s recycling service. Households will also be able to order larger or extra green recycling bins to help them recycle.

Collections of waste in the additional brown bins will stop at the property around three or four weeks after the letter has been received by the household. ​Households in Wallington North will be the first to receive the letters and the timing of the change will be staggered according to the area.

The council will remove from households any additional brown bins placed outside on any waste collection day that follows a specified date. However, residents can keep their additional brown bin for storage or to collect garden waste in before taking it to the Reuse and Recycling Centre at Kimpton Park Way. To ensure their additional brown bin is not removed, residents will need to keep it inside their property boundary.

Mary Morrissey, Strategic Director of Environment, Housing and Regeneration at Sutton Council, said:

“Collecting just one brown waste bin per property will save the council money and increase the amount of waste being recycled in Sutton. The additional brown bins that the council empties contain 100 tonnes of materials that could be recycled every year. Instead these materials are being disposed of in landfill. Emptying one bin per property will therefore help us save money, increase the borough’s recycling rate and support the council’s One Planet Sutton ambitions. A study by independent environmental experts indicates that council collection costs can be reduced by £10,000 a year by only collecting one bin per property.”

This new waste and recycling policy was agreed by Sutton Council in November 2015.

Recycling News

Don’t throw it out – pass it on
There are so many ways that people can re-use old clothes, furniture, and household items – and just because you don’t want it any more doesn’t mean that someone else won’t.
Sutton Council is helping residents find ways they can re-use household items to benefit the environment & reduce costs. This will help the borough achieve its One Planet Sutton aims of becoming a greener, more sustainable area.

Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environments & Neighbourhoods Committee, said:
It’s too easy to assume that the only thing to do with our old clothes, furniture and household items is throw them out when they’ve outlived their use to us. But too often we don’t think about whether we can pass them on rather than dispose of them. There are so many ways to save money and help the environment by avoiding needless waste – encouraging people to re-use items is one of our top priorities.”

There are five main reasons to re-use household items rather than dispose of them:
Saving money: Buying second hand is cheaper than buying new – and if you can sell on older unwanted items yourself that’s extra money for the household budget.
Help other people: Donating items for re-use helps other members of the community – give someone else the chance to love the things you don’t need any more.
Help climate change by saving energy: By re-using items we help reduce the amount of energy used to produce and supply products.
Help ourselves by conserving the planet’s resources: Every time new things are made, raw materials are used. Some of these materials will run out at some point and mining, quarrying and logging for them creates air and water pollution around the world. We play a part in reducing this when we choose to re-use rather than buy new.
Reduce waste: Re-using things means we send less of Sutton’s waste to landfill sites. Doesn’t it make sense to not bury things in the ground when somebody else in Sutton or elsewhere could still be using them?
One way to pass on unwanted goods is by using sites such as Freecycle, eBay, or Gumtree, where you can arrange to sell or even gift items rather than dispose of them. Placing an advert in a local classified paper is also a great way of finding people who may want the items you don’t need any more.
Not all items will have a resale value. But that doesn’t mean these items should be disposed of either. There are many charitable organisations who will accept and even collect donations of older clothes or furniture items as well as old CDs, DVDs and books. It’s also possible to donate old computer equipment to some organisations.

Learning some basic maintenance and mending techniques can help you make clothes last longer – it could even be the chance to learn new skills as SCOLA have classes in upholstery, sewing, and jewellery repair. Additionally, many local dry-cleaners will offer repair services at reasonable prices to help keep your clothes looking good for longer.

One Planet Sutton is a vision for Sutton where people lead happy, healthy lives with a fair share of the Earth’s resources. Sutton Council has committed to becoming a One Planet Borough by 2025. The council is working in partnership with a wide range of local voluntary and community groups to deliver this vision under the themes of cutting carbon emissions, cutting waste, valuing our natural environment, supporting healthy communities and supporting the local economy. You can find out more about the One Planet Sutton initiative here.

Visit the Sutton Council website here for more in-depth tips about reusing and recycling clothes, furniture and other household goods. There are also information about local organisation and charities which will accept donations and details of how to get in touch with them.

The British Heart Foundation and Emmaus Homeless Foundation will arrange collection of larger, bulky items in Wallington and Sutton.

Sutton residents find cool way to learn about reducing food waste

The BIG Freeze came to Sutton High Street on Friday 15 January and residents heard how they can save money by freezing some leftover foods and reduce food waste.

Shoppers on Sutton High Street were presented with some chilling facts about food waste with the aid of a large inflatable freezer appearing for the first time in London.

Love Food Hate Waste’s BIG Freeze event, in association with Sutton Council, aimed to inform borough residents about how they can save money and reduce food waste by keeping leftovers and certain foods in their freezers to reuse and make the most of their shopping. The average household throws out a staggering £60 of food a month, and over the course of a year that adds up to around £700.

A team of advisers was on hand to engage shoppers in conversation and share handy money-saving tips. Interactive quizzes and puzzles tested passers-by on their knowledge of which items can and cannot be frozen, and there was also the chance to enter a prize draw with a prize of a Nutribullet or an ice cream maker.

Carshalton Central Cllr Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment & Neighbourhood Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“One of the ways we can all reduce food waste is by making sure we’re freezing leftovers rather than throwing them away. I understand as a householder that it can be difficult to remember exactly what can be frozen safely – we’re proud to work together with organisations like Love Food Hate Waste to become a greener borough.

“Reducing food waste is not only good for our environment but it’s good for our wallets.”

As a Sustainable Food City, Sutton is committed to reducing food waste. The reduction of food waste and associated costs means more money can be invested in vital services and the borough can achieve its One Planet Sutton aims.

James McGowan, Campaign Manager for Love Food Hate Waste, said:

“Each time we come to Sutton we’re impressed by how committed the council and residents are to reducing food waste. The BIG Freeze is a great event and it’s a pleasure to see our messages delivered in such a receptive and engaging manner. Freezing food is a great way to extend its shelf life and help us out when we’ve cooked too much of something.”

Love Food Hate Waste’s BIG Freeze event has recently toured the country appearing in 10 major UK cities. It was quite a coup for Sutton to be the first London borough to see it – now it’s up to all of us in the area to prevent good food going to waste and help build a better planet.

The Sutton Love Food Hate Waste campaign is funded by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) after Sutton Council’s successful bid for funding.

Sutton Council to work with residents to improve borough recycling rates

Sutton Council will work with residents to reduce the number of uncollected recycling bins and improve Sutton’s recycling rate.

Green recycling bins cannot collected if the wrong items have been placed in them. A complete list of the items which can be placed in them and the items which should instead be placed in brown refuse bins can be found at www.sutton.gov.uk/recycling.

Waste & recycling advisers will deliver letters to residents whose recycling collections cannot be taken explaining why, and will offer help and advice about ways to easily resolve the situation.

The letters will also contain advice about which items can and cannot be recycled in the borough. This way, residents will be informed about the reasons for non-collections and what they can do to make sure their recycling is always collected.

Jill Whitehead, Chair of the Environment & Neighbourhoods Committee at Sutton Council, said:

“We know Sutton residents care about the environment and are committed to recycling. Our recycling rate is above the London average and that’s something of which we can be very proud. However, there are still ways we can improve upon this. By working with our residents and making sure they are aware of exactly what can be recycled, and giving them clear and helpful advice about why a collection may not be taken, we know that we can achieve an even greener Sutton.”

In the past contamination has resulted in whole lorryloads of recycled materials being rejected at the recycling facility. Instead of being recycled all the material ends up being sent to landfill. Recycling has lots of benefits for our communities, the main one being that it is far cheaper to dispose of good quality recyclable material than it is to send it to landfill. That money can then be spent on other council services.

Sutton’s current recycling rate is 37%, above the London average of 34%.

Happy New Year from Jill, Alan and Hamish – Sutton Council’s web site for “Report It”

https://www.sutton.gov.uk/info/200447/report_it

 

Report it

Rubbish & recycling